How do we prepare our students to succeed in a fast-changing world? To collaborate with people from around the globe? To create innovation as technology increasingly takes over routine work? To use advanced thinking skills in the face of more complex challenges? To show resilience in the face of constant change? These are questions educators around the world are trying to address and to determine the skills and competencies which are increasingly important for our students in the 21st century.

At Cambridge, we are working on a project to help teachers understand these skills or competencies better, and how they can be developed within English language programmes.  We developed the Cambridge Life Competencies Framework, based on a review of research that has been carried out in related areas.  We have also started work on examining the different stages of the learning journey, and how these competencies vary across each stage. Click on the images below to view the introduction booklet and the booklets for each of the 7 competencies (pdfs). 

This is an ongoing project, and we are currently in the process of further developing and validating the Framework, and its details.  If you would like to get involved in this validation activity, please complete the short form here. If you have any questions or comments on the framework, please send an email to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

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Cambridge Papers in ELT

Written by academic experts, this series of papers connects the deeper insights of linguistic and pedagogical research with the reality of everyday ELT practice.

To see our full range of Papers, go to the Cambridge ELT - Better Learning Insights website.

GrammarThe English Grammar Profile (EGP) is a sister resource to the English Vocabulary Profile, and has been put together by Anne O'Keeffe (Limerick University) and Geraldine Mark, the co-authors, along with Ron Carter and Mike McCarthy, of English Grammar Today (Cambridge University Press). Mark and O'Keeffe investigated the extensive data in the Cambridge Learner Corpus to establish when learners begin to get to grips with different linguistic structures. 

A series of insights from their research will be posted on this page, each one putting the spotlight on an interesting aspect of learner grammar development. Please note that all of the learner examples come from the Cambridge Learner Corpus, a 55-million word electronic collection of written learner data. The examination and the candidate’s first language are given in brackets after each learner example.

See the latest Grammar Spotlight entry below. Scroll right down to the bottom of this page to browse through previous entries.


 

wowWith its 120th word, Word of the Week has now come to an end. We hope you enjoyed this free feature and that it has given you an insight into the thinking and research behind the English Vocabulary Profile.

All 120 are still available to read in our archive, below. Each Word of the Week in the archive is followed by a link to the full entry for that word on the English Vocabulary Profile. To view the entries, you will need to subscribe to the EVP: to subscribe for free click here.

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