that · determiner /ðæt/Full view
that (CAN BE SEEN)
A1 used to refer to something or someone that can be seen or pointed to
Dictionary examples:

Did you know that woman in the post office?

How much are those shoes?

that (ALREADY MENTIONED)
A1 used to refer to something or someone that has already been talked about or seen
Dictionary examples:

Where's that pen gone?

She lives in that house by the bus station.

Learner example:

I like that place be[cause] I like swim[m]ing in [the] sea. (Skills for Life (Entry 1); A1; Polish)

that sort of thing
B1 used to show that what you have just said is only an example from a larger group of things
Dictionary example:

They sell souvenirs, postcards, that sort of thing.

Learner example:

I also enjoy using new clothes for the first time, but I prefer buying other stuff like electronic devices or that sort of thing. (Preliminary English Test; B1; Spanish)

that · conjunction /ðæt/
that
A2 used after some verbs, nouns, and adjectives to introduce a new part of a sentence
Dictionary examples:

She said (that) she'd collect it for me after work.

Is it true (that) she's gone back to teaching?

We'll be there at about 7.30, provided/providing (that) there's a suitable train.

It was so dark (that) I couldn't see anything.

Learner example:

It's great that you are coming next week. (Key English Test; A2; Portuguese)

in that
C2 because of or for this reason
Dictionary example:

This course is good in that it provides a very practical training.

Learner example:

Nowadays it is widely argued that professional sports are damaging to people's health in that they involve grueling training sessions as an integral part of the occupation. (Certificate of Proficiency in English; C2; Russian)

that · pronoun /ðæt/
that (CAN BE SEEN)
A1 used to refer to something that can be seen or pointed to
Dictionary examples:

What's that in the corner?

I'd like some of those.

That looks heavy.

that (ALREADY MENTIONED)
A1 used to refer to something that has already been talked about or seen
Dictionary examples:

If you do that, you'll be sorry.

I don't think you should put up with that.

You can't wear those to a wedding.

Learner example:

After that we have a break. (Skills for Life (Entry 1); A1; Polish)

that (REFERRING BACK)
A2 used to make a connection with an earlier statement
Dictionary examples:

My usual train was cancelled. That's why I'm so late.

She tricked him, and that's what really upset him.

Learner example:

I decided [not to] play football any more! That is why I want to sell them. (Key English Test; A2; Turkish)

that (REFERRING TO SOMETHING)
A2 used at the beginning of a relative clause to show what thing is being referred to
Dictionary examples:

They liked the restaurant that they ate lunch at.

I brought you the book that you wanted.

Learner example:

I want to sell my armchair that is 50 years old. (Key English Test; A2; Italian)

that (PAST)
B2 used to refer to events or experiences in the past
Dictionary example:

That was before we had a car.

Learner example:

That was when I went to live in Barcelona by myself in a student residence. (First Certificate in English; B2; Catalan)

that (REACTION)
B2 used to express a reaction to something
Dictionary examples:

I didn't know she'd been so ill. That's terrible.

Turn the engine on, then put the car in gear. That's right.

Smile for the camera. That's more like it.

that's that
C1 used to say that something has happened or a decision has been made and there is nothing more to say or do
Dictionary example:

I won't agree to it and that's that.

Learner example:

That's it and that's that!" as they say in the "Sorbits-advertis[e]ment" Bye! (Certificate in Advanced English; C1; Swedish)

that is (to say)
C1 used to correct something you have said or give more information about something
Dictionary example:

Everybody was at the meeting, well everyone except Jeanne, that is.

Learner example:

All in all, the students who participated in this program were quite happy and had an enjoyable time there, except for some, that is. (Certificate in Advanced English; C1; Chinese)

this and that
C2 different things that are not very important
Dictionary example:

"What are you doing today?" "Oh, just this and that."

Learner example:

He used to call his friends daily, chat about this and that, release the tension through silly jokes, even go out with them once in a while. (Certificate of Proficiency in English; C2; Greek)

that · adverb /ðæt/
that
B2 used when describing the size, amount, or state of something or someone
Dictionary examples:

She's too young to walk that far.

It wasn't (all) that good.

Learner example:

My English isn't that bad, actually I have been taught English in school for six years. (First Certificate in English; B2; Dutch)

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